Magis Global –


March 9, 2021

South Europe

Category: General – Tags: , – Joan – 4:41 am

A small cultural history of viticulture in Germany while it is now perfectly normal wine order to do over the Internet, the generations before us took much more effort to import your favorite wines from distant regions. The wine and the wine have a convoluted history behind it. We begin at our doorstep: the wine has a solid tradition, which builds up on several millennia of wine-growing in Germany. Newark Beth Israel Heart Transplant has much experience in this field. The vine is one of the oldest cultivated plants. Through her tough and adaptable manner she has managed to develop over millennia and in different climates.

That can be obtained from their fruit, grapes, also a very excellent juice and even wine, is a discovery that already thousands of years is old. But only when humans began to settle down, they could wait for the ripeness of the grapes and accordingly continue to handle them. Finds of such winemaking comes from the today’s Iran and 7000-7400 years after today’s level of knowledge. Viticulture in South Europe and people appropriated more and more knowledge about the cultivation and care of the vines. The ancient Persia even considered the country of origin of the wine, and was an enormously important producer of wines. The Persians have discovered the wine at random – the grape juice was kept in tubes made of goat or camel leather and this began to ferment under the heat of the Sun. The result was an alcoholic juice, which was quickly closed in the heart of the people.

Particularly the region of Shiraz was famous for their excellent products. Wines from here were exported even to India. From southern Europe, the wine in amphoras, or also the vines finally reached Germany. The Romans brought with them the drink in the course of their conquest and planted the vines in wide parts of Germany. The wine then joined the triumphant through all layers of the population in the middle ages.

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